Month: October 1997

blather.net
1097 views

Welcome, once again, to the literary crime sometimes referred to as 'Blather'. It has come to my attention, and of course, to the attention of many others, that a certain backlash has erupted against the works of Bram Stoker, author of 'Dracula', and the traditional celebration of Halloween, or 'Samhain'. Bram Stoker was born at 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, Dublin on November 8th, 1847. Fifty years later, on May 26th 1897, the book with which he attained notoriety, 'Dracula', was published. He wrote a total of 18 books, most of which go unread these days, although several are on similar themes to his famous vampiric novel. Mild celebrations have taken place in Dublin this year, in commemoration of the two anniversaries. The Irish Film Centre had a weekend of vampire movies, the Bram Stoker Summer School took place in July and a stage version of Dracula was recently staged at...

blather.net
1094 views

Each Monday, I'm given to ponder on the content of each forthcoming 'Blather', often worrying there will be nothing particularly topical to discuss. Can a week go by without anything utterly bizarre happening? Fortunately, these fears are always rapidly put to rest, due to the Universe's unerring reliability in delivering some new fortean anomaly. A rather amusing, classically fortean story crashed onto the Blather newsdesk this week, in the shape of a cannonball. The 'civil war-type' missile tore through a window and two walls of Leonard and Kathy Mickelson's mobile home, in House Springs, Missouri, on Thursday night 16th of October, according to the Associated Press. Nobody was home when it happened, and the neighbours noticed nothing strange. Police are reportedly investigating the possible use of a small cannon, a weapon readily available for Civil War re-enactments. In an apparently unrelated incident reported by the Associated Press in Cincinnati, Ohio,...

blather.net
3208 views

Welcome to Blather of the Baltic, playboy of the Skagerrak, who is now safely ensconced again in Blather HQ after some Scandinavian adventures, from which I returned relatively unscathed, save for the media exposure and arson accusations. Other points of note were the proliferation of mythical beasts adorning the beautiful architecture of Copenhagen (dragons with 12 breasts) and an odd column of black smokey stuff somewhere in the region of 10 degrees from the vertical, at about 35,000 feet (10,600 metres) above Jutland, seen from the window of the BlatherAir staff runabout. Some interesting news has been professed to me this week, first up is the somewhat disquieting news that Nicholas Cage and his production company Saturn Films, in conjunction with 20th Century Fox, are to making a movie entitled 'Tom Slick: Monster Hunter', a comedy adventure based on the oil tycoon who spent some of the 1950s and much...

blather.net
1230 views

Welcome to Blather, in particular all the people who signed up having found this weekly slippery soapbox through 'Cool Site of the Day' on Tuesday 7th October. In response to last week's defence of defamed marsupials, the Rev. Syd Jesus stepped in with an immortal Raymond Chandler quote, which was: 'as easy to spot as a kangaroo in a dinner jacket'. Also spotted was some delirious 1920's journalism mentioned in Bernard Heuvelman's 'On the Track of Unknown Animals' (ISBN: 0710304986), describing a brontosaurus which was apparently running riot in Africa (which prompted many expeditions to find the damned thing) as having a tail like a kangaroo. Quite a brontosaurus, especially when one realises that the sum of the description led one to believe that it looked more like a triceratops. With a kangaroo's tail. This week I'm afraid that I see fit to launch into a timely if somewhat hopeless...

blather.net
1363 views

For many years now, I've noticed, with alarming regularity, the loyal sycophants and peasantry at Castle Blather tripping over their leg manacles and muttering such bizarre utterances as 'Huh, kangaroos, yeah, what next'. It was only last week that curiosity eventually got the better of me, and nothing would do but for me to whisk a collection of them off to the torture rooms for questioning. The shocking conclusion that I was appalled to reach, after they had been wheeled back to their cubicles and I had collated their wretched accounts, was that an alarmingly large quantity of reported anomalous animals had been described as 'kangaroo-like'. This puzzled me, since Captain Cook and his crew were reportedly the first Europeans to see kangaroos when their ship 'The Endeavour' reached Australia in 1770, which gave me to wonder, how did we describe the aforementioned mystery animals before this? As devil-like, or...