380 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Glacier ice floating in Torssaukatak, Kujalleq, South Greenland,, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Glacier ice floating in Torssaukatak, Kujalleq, South Greenland, en route to Prins Christiansund from the deck of the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise during expedition to investigate the effects of climate change in the Arctic.

421 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Iceberg arch in Kane Basin, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Iceberg archway in an iceberg calved from the 110km wide Humboldt Glacier, Kane Basin, remote north west Greenland

334 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Icebergs and low cloud in Kane Basin, North West Greenland, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Icebergs and low cloud in Kane Basin, North West Greenland, seen from the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise, Arctic Meltdown expedition 2009

467 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Snowing on the sunset at the mouth of Isfjord, Svalbard, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Snowing on the sunset at the mouth of Isfjord, Spitsbergen, in the Norwegian archipelego of Svalbard. Seen from the deck of the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise, during an expedition to examine the effects of climate change on the Arctic.

442 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Gyrfalcon, Fram Strait, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Gyrfalcon, landing on a helicopter ("Lucky Bird") on the deck of the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise in Fram Strait, 78 49 N, 0 35E. The largest falcon, the Gyrfalcon can reach speeds of up to 200km an hour in measured flight. Follow our expedition blog: weblog.greenpeace.org/climate/arctic_meltdown/

670 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Iceberg under cloud, Kangerdlugssuaq Fjord, East Greenland, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. YES this is a colour image! Iceberg under cloud, Kangerdlugssuaq Fjord, East Greenland. Taken from the deck of the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise on 29 August 2009, during an expedition to investigate the effects of climate change in the Arctic. Btw, the white streaks you can see behind the cloud and the 'berg are actually streaks of snow on a mountain, on the side of the fjord. The images is not desaturated - I just underexposed the hell out of it. So, it's not a monochrome image. In fact, in Lightroom, the only controls I used were exposure, blacks, lights, darks, and shadows. No colour has been removed or added in the picture,...

805 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Humpback Whale, Sermilik Fjord, East Greenland, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Humpback Whale, one of three feeding in Sermilik Fjord, East Greenland, seen from the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise, during our Arctic Meltdown expedition. weblog.greenpeace.org/climate/arctic_impacts/

1082 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Melt River, Petermann Glacier, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Melt River, Petermann Glacier, Greenland. Photographed on the first leg of the Greenpeace Arctic Impacts expedition 07/07/2009. Peterman glacier is the longest floating glacier in the northern hemisphere. The floating area is 16km by 80km. A 100 square km chunk, about 5 billion tonnes of ice is about to break off - and we're planning on being there to see it. More at weblog.greenpeace.org/climate

1060 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Polar Bear!, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Polar Bear checking the water for seals. Photographed from the deck of the Greenpeace Ship Arctic Sunrise, Monday June 29th, at the ice edge of the Lincoln Sea, Arctic Ocean. Photo: (c) 2009 Dave Walsh Here's an extract from a blog entry I wrote about Monday: The crew of the Arctic Sunrise is on top of the world today, for many mindblowing reasons. As I write this, the ship is nudged up against the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean at 82.5 north - a latitude higher than any Greenpeace ship has achieved before, as far as we know. A couple of hours after we arrived, and had barely finished breakfast, a young polar bear loped past, seemingly...

1112 views

.flickr-photo { border: solid 2px #000000; } .flickr-yourcomment { } .flickr-frame { text-align: left; padding: 3px; } .flickr-caption { font-size: 0.8em; margin-top: 0px; } Petermann Glacier from above, originally uploaded by Dave Walsh Photography. Petermann Glacier, seen from above, northwestern Greenland. To get a sense of scale, I'd say you're looking at an area about 1.5km wide. Photographed from a helicopter on the first leg of the Greenpeace Arctic Impacts expedition 07/07/2009. Peterman glacier is the longest floating glacier in the northern hemisphere. The floating area is 16km by 80km. A 100 square km chunk, about 5 billion tonnes of ice is about to break off - and we're planning on being there to see it. Read my articles at the Climate Change blog weblog.greenpeace.org/climate